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  • Monday, November 22, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Latin America and the Caribbean is the region where there are more women entrepreneurs.

    Despite the difficulties that the COVID-19 pandemic has implied and adverse conditions such as the gender gap, in America, especially in Latin America, 24% of women are entrepreneurs.

    Women entrepreneurship in Mexico.

    With 4 million 600,000 women who are self-employed and create companies that create jobs, Mexico ranks 4 among the countries with the most women entrepreneurs, according to the 2020-2021 study by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, which considered 43 countries worldwide, 10 of them from the American continent.

    Until the IMCO count in March 2021, Mexican female employer entrepreneurs were mainly concentrated in the restaurant, accommodation and commerce sectors. By comparison, male employers are concentrated in the construction, agriculture and livestock sectors.

    One of the main motivations of Mexican women to undertake is the lack of flexibility in traditional jobs, so that in this way their ventures allow them to generate an income without abandoning their activities at home.

    The Mexican Institute for Competitiveness (IMCO) found that an average Mexican entrepreneur is between 25 and 44 years old, is married, has one or two children, earns 3,707 pesos a month, studied until high school and operates informally.

    According to data from the National Survey of Occupation and Employment (ENOE), entrepreneurship in formality brings multiple benefits such as average income 2.5 times higher than those who undertake in informality. The reality is that in Mexico 8 out of 10 women undertake informally, so they cannot have access to these benefits and that it becomes a factor to undertake and maintain such enterprises over time.

    This lack of formality in ventures is mainly due to 3 factors: the high cost in time and money of administrative procedures, the lack of access to financing and the lack of training in finance, accounting, business development and other skills. .

    The increase in informality in women's businesses became more evident from the start of the pandemic in 2020, due to the elimination of jobs and the definitive closure of businesses.

    Coupled with informality, there is the fact that the number of women who manage to grow their business through the recruitment of personnel is considerably less than that of men.

    It may interest you: 5 books for unstoppable female entrepreneurs

    The gender gap between entrepreneurs, which is 37%, is another factor that complicates female entrepreneurship in Mexico: at the end of 2021, self-employed women earned an average of 4,008 pesos, while self-employed men earned 6,338 pesos per month.

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  • Monday, November 15, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Women are no strangers to entrepreneurship. They have been breaking barriers and leading the way for fellow boss ladies since the 19th century. From running home-based businesses to scaling large teams, women have come so far, breaking glass ceilings along the way.

    Today's women are finding success with startups or branching out on their own as independent consultants or freelancers. With women now accounting for approximately 20% (and growing!) of small business owners in America, it is time we celebrate Women's Entrepreneurship Day on November 19, 2021!

    Here are five intangible benefits that women can "cash in on" when it comes to starting their own business and adding "entrepreneur" to their long list of titles.

    1. Running a business allows for independence. Consider how flexible your schedule might be if you don't have to clock in and clock out every day. You get to set your own schedule based on needs — whether that's your family, your health or your business.

    2. You can put your passions to work. As an entrepreneur, you get the opportunity to pursue what interests and excites you in the world, rather than hoping for it on someone else's terms.

    Click Here to read the rest.


  • Monday, November 08, 2021 4:00 AM | Anonymous

    Women are no strangers to entrepreneurship. They have been breaking barriers and leading the way for fellow boss ladies since the 19th century. From running home-based businesses to scaling large teams, women have come so far, breaking glass ceilings along the way.

    Today's women are finding success with startups or branching out on their own as independent consultants or freelancers. With women now accounting for approximately 20% (and growing!) of small business owners in America, it is time we celebrate Women's Entrepreneurship Day on November 19, 2021!

    Here are five intangible benefits that women can "cash in on" when it comes to starting their own business and adding "entrepreneur" to their long list of titles.

    1. Running a business allows for independence. Consider how flexible your schedule might be if you don't have to clock in and clock out every day. You get to set your own schedule based on needs — whether that's your family, your health or your business.

    2. You can put your passions to work. As an entrepreneur, you get the opportunity to pursue what interests and excites you in the world, rather than hoping for it on someone else's terms.


    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article

  • Monday, November 01, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Running a business is a lot of work. Sometimes, you need a little inspiration to get you through the rough patches. And the best thing is inspiration can come from anywhere–even a movie! Many people watch movies for entertainment, but some have many valuable lessons entrepreneurs can apply in their businesses.

    These 3 movies teach you good business management practices and also show you what you should never do. You’ve probably watched them, but you’ll now see them in a new light.


    Wall Street: Greed is Good

    Wall Street is the story of a young stockbroker, Bud Fox, who enters a volatile stock exchange market with an aggressive mindset after getting trained by his wealthy but unscrupulous boss—Gordon Gekko. Gordon uses Bud Fox and other people around him to gather the information he needs to grow his wealth. He makes some immoral decisions due to his insatiable greed that finally lead to his downfall–and the downfall of everyone around him.

    But there’s one thing the movie teaches entrepreneurs in capital markets and corporate finance–that greed can propel them to success quickly. However, being greedy can lead you down a slippery slope to ruin.

    Steve Jobs: Struggles are Part of the Journey to Success

    The film Steve Jobs delves into the life of Apple’s founder. It examines his business acumen and personal life. Although the narrative mainly surrounds the success of Apple, the movie shows the struggles and failures Steve Jobs met along the way. It portrays his ingenuity and passion as the driving forces behind his success. He also made a lot of sacrifices that ultimately affected his health.

    The critical lesson entrepreneurs can learn from the movie is struggles and failures are part of the entrepreneurship journey. You’ll meet opposition along the way or even face financial struggles. You may even have to look for car title loans online to save your business. Put your business first and understand that you can be different and still be better. In business, you should be willing to lose to find your path.

    The Intern: Do Not Stereotype

    The Intern features a startup ecommerce company that hires a 70-year old intern—Ben Whittaker. Jules Ostin, the CEO, is concerned about his age and argues that an old dog can’t learn new tricks. Whittaker proves her wrong after learning very fast from his younger coworkers. He offers new suggestions and ideas that work, getting Ostin to rely on him for advice.

    When Ostin learns that her husband is cheating on her, she decides to step down as CEO to spend more time with her family and try to save her marriage. Whittaker points out that there’s no need to give up her position, that it’s possible to dedicate time to both the business and her family. Ostin agrees and decides to remain as CEO. Her husband apologizes for his deeds, and it’s a win-win for everyone.


    Click Here to Read the rest of the article.

  • Monday, October 25, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Spanx founder Sara Blakely is a billionaire once again, Forbes estimates, following a deal to sell the majority of her shapewear company.


    Private equity giant Blackstone announced Wednesday that it has agreed to buy a majority stake in the shapewear pioneer, in a deal that values the company at $1.2 billion. Blakely will retain “a significant equity stake” in the company she bootstrapped, according to Blackstone. The investment propels her net worth back over the $1 billion threshold after a rocky pandemic retail landscape and heightened competition hindered Spanx’s growth—and dragged Blakely’s billion-dollar fortune down to an estimated $750 million in June.

    “People have asked me for 20 years, ‘When will you sell Spanx?’ And for 20 years I would say…‘I’ll just know.’ Well that day is today,” Blakely, who will become Spanx’s executive chair, wrote in an Instagram post Wednesday. Blakely praised the all-female team she worked with at Blackstone and spelled out her new role: “I will remain a significant shareholder and continue to help the business fulfill its greatest potential, as well as continue to fulfill my greatest passion—elevating women.”

    The companies aren’t sharing the size of the stake Blakely will retain in the shapewear firm she founded 21 years ago, which could be as high as 49% given Blackstone's majority ownership. Blakely, 50, has held Spanx closely over the years, declining to accept outside funding until now. But after factoring in Wednesday’s deal and Blakely's other assets—which include a small stake in the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks and nearly $40 million worth of real estate—Forbes estimates her net worth to be $1.2 billion as a result of the deal. A spokesperson for Spanx did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

    In a story that’s now been told and retold, Spanx came to life as a way for Blakely to deal with an irritating problem. Unable to find suitable undergarments to wear under cream-colored pants for a party, Blakely cut the feet off her control top pantyhouse and wore them underneath...but they rolled up on her all night long. “I remember thinking, ‘I’ve got to figure out how to make this.’ I’d never worked in fashion or retail. I just needed an undergarment that didn’t exist,” Blakely once told Forbes.


    Click Here to the Rest of the Article

  • Monday, October 18, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Mastercard, the Official Payment Technology Partner of Expo 2020 Dubai, has teamed up with the region’s largest network for women-owned businesses, Female Fusion, to unlock opportunities for women entrepreneurs at the world’s largest cultural gathering.

    The collaboration will result in a host of knowledge-sharing, networking and mentoring events aimed at women-owned businesses that will aim to empower and educate them, to grow and scale their businesses and include them in an evolving digital economy. The series of activities, designed to accelerate women’s impact in creating a better world, will take place at the Women’s Pavilion by Expo 2020, in collaboration with Cartier. There will also be virtual workshops hosted during the six-month period.

    The alliance will invite notable guests, including Sarah Beydoun, Founder and Creative Director of a social impact fashion business in Lebanon; Ioanna Angelidaki, co-founder of Instashop; and Maureen Hall, Founder and CEO of a sunwear brand. The workshops will empower entrepreneurs with valuable skills to go digital and grow digital in their ventures. 

    According to the inaugural Mastercard MEA SME Confidence Index, 81% of the region’s women entrepreneurs have a digital presence for their businesses, compared to 68% of their male counterparts. In terms of a digital footprint of the region’s women entrepreneurs, social media (71%) leads the way, followed by a company website (57%).

    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article

  • Monday, October 11, 2021 4:00 AM | Anonymous

    MEA is home to some of the world’s highest and lowest rates of female entrepreneurship. With total entrepreneurial activity (TEA), sub-Saharan Africa leads the world with the highest rates at 27 per cent. In fact, there are seven countries in the world where women had equal or higher levels of entrepreneurship than their male counterparts – three of the seven countries are in MEA and all three MEA ones are in Africa – Nigeria, Ghana and Uganda (the remaining four are Panama, Thailand, Ecuador and Mexico. It is interesting to note at other regions with high TEA rates of female entrepreneurs, in particular Latin America and the Caribbean). 

    MEA, despite having sub-Saharan Africa leading the world, is also home one of the world’s lowest rates of women TEA, where in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) it is at a mere 4 per cent.

    Mastercard last year launched its latest edition of its Mastercard Index of Women Entrepreneurs (MIWE) and Israel led the list at number one (Israel, often known as the Startup Nation, was the only country in MEA on the top ten which also included in the following order: The United States, Switzerland, New Zealand, Poland, the UK, Canada, Sweden, Australia and Spain). The report involved an in-depth analysis across 12 indicators and 25 sub-indicators spanning Advancement Outcomes, Knowledge Assets and Financial Access, and Supporting Entrepreneurial Conditions – the index ranked each economy according to its performance over the past year – as stated in its report.

    TECH AND FINTECH INNOVATIONS ARE LEADING THE WAY

    Unfortunately, the tech sector (as is much of other sectors) is still male dominated – whereby 90% of tech CEOs are male. Interestingly though is that within MEA, in MENA the percentage of female entrepreneurs in tech is at 35%. Even though its TEA rate is really low it is notable that the percentage of female entrepreneurs is relatively high in tech.

    MENA also leads in digital footprint with respect to female entrepreneurs. Via Mastercard, women-owned small and medium enterprises (SMEs) believe there are huge benefits of a cash-free economy to their businesses. This is via the Mastercard MEA SME Confidence Index, which highlighted that 81% of the region’s female entrepreneurs have a digital presence for their businesses, which leads in comparison to 68% of their male counterparts. With regards to the digital footprint of the region’s female entrepreneurs, social media (71%) leads the way, followed by a company website (57%). By looking at MENA specifically, the study found that more female entrepreneurs had a website (at 71%) in comparison to a social media presence (at 55%).

    The wider MEA region is seeing a growing list of female entrepreneurs and this includes the wider fintech industry. Middle East-born companies such as Souqalmal.com founder and CEO’s Ambareen Musa), which is an insurtech company, to robo-advisory Sarwa co-founder Nadine Mezher to Rumman’s co-founder Shurouq Qawariq to SolidBlock’s co-CEO and cofounder Yael Tamar – show a growing rise of female entrepreneurs in the fintech and wider tech space.

    In Africa, examples of female CEOs and/or cofounders in the fintech space include the likes of Nigeria’s Piggyvest co-founder and COO Odunayo Eweniyi, Pezescha of Kenya’s founder and CEO Hilda Moraa,  Lebo Mokgabudi from South Africa as the founder and CEO of Eaglequest Africa and Lilian Makoi from Tanzania who is the founder of Mipango – to name a few.

    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article

  • Monday, October 04, 2021 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    Groupon, the go-to destination for local experiences, is encouraging everyone to celebrate October’s National Women’s Small Business Month. To make it easy to support and shop at women-owned businesses, Groupon is featuring approximately 2,000 women-owned businesses from across the United States. Groupon spoke with more than 600 women small business owners from around the United States to better understand why they decided to become their own boss and how they have remained resilient during the global pandemic.

    This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211001005480/en/

    In recognition of October's National Women's Small Business Month, Groupon spoke with more than 600 women small business owners from around the United States to better understand why they decided to become their own boss and how they have remained resilient during the global pandemic. (Graphic: Business Wire)

    Women Small Business Owners Say They’re Held to a Different Standard than Men

    According to the survey results, women small business owners continue to face systemic challenges as a result of their gender. Fifty-four percent of women small business owners said they’re held to a different standard than their male counterparts when it comes to accessing capital, acquiring mentors and being taken seriously by their peers. Fifty-four percent of survey respondents also said that it’s harder for them to balance work and family life.

    Women Put in the Work to be Their Own Boss

    Despite these obstacles, nearly all women small business owners––an overwhelming 94% ––are happy with their choice to work for themselves and ready to overcome any challenges thrown their way. Seventy-six percent of women small business owners work beyond the standard 8-hour work day, with the average owner working 12 hours a day. And this hard work is paying off, as 64% of women small business owners said they make as much or more money than they did before opening their own business.

    “As one of the largest marketplaces of women-owned small businesses anywhere in the world, we’re excited and encouraged by the progress these entrepreneurs are making, and we’re focused on opening up new opportunities for women –– both internally and externally –– to create a Groupon that’s reflective of the world we want to live in,” said Groupon’s Chief Financial Officer Melissa Thomas. “We’re extremely proud of the fact that nearly 60%* of the small businesses on Groupon are owned by women, and we’re committed to ensuring these merchants come out of the pandemic stronger than ever.”

    Increasing Awareness and Support for Women-Owned Businesses

    According to the survey results, women small business owners have a clear plan and path to drive revenue and accelerate their recovery from the pandemic. The top ways that women-owned businesses are looking to increase profits are the following: growing their social media presence, leveraging sales, expanding inventory, taking advantage of government or small business organization loans and resources and running paid advertising campaigns.

    Even before the start of the pandemic, many states invested heavily in education and financial programs to help foster the development and success of small businesses. After the pandemic hit, many states stepped up to help the businesses impacted by movement restrictions in the form of deferring sales tax payments and increasing financial support through state grants.

    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article.

  • Monday, September 27, 2021 8:00 AM | Anonymous

    At 52, Jennifer Lopez has done what only a few have accomplished: Since the late 1980s, she has successfully built careers as an actress, musician, entrepreneur and businesswoman.

    The key to her business acumen and brand-building sense, she says: emphasizing the unique qualities she brings to the table and being resilient. “It’s about being the scarce asset,” Lopez recently told Adweek.

    By honing into her individual talents and roots as a Puerto Rican woman from the Bronx, N.Y., Lopez has built an empire that includes endorsement deals with shoe retailer DSW and luxury design house Coach, a philanthropic arm called Limitless Labs that’s partnering with Goldman Sachs to support Latinx entrepreneurs and her new line of beauty products JLO Beauty, which she founded this year.

    Today, Lopez is one of America’s wealthiest self-made women, with an estimated net worth exceeding $150 million, according to Forbes. And according to Lopez, there’s a superpower behind her success: “There’s only one me.”

    The idea of focusing on what differentiates you may seem simple, but especially in creative industries, women are often sold the idea that they are “a dime a dozen” and “disposable,” Lopez said. “That’s not the truth.”

    Lopez said everyone has something unique about themselves that no one else has, and she’s learned to foster those skills. “I am the scarce asset — somebody who is a proven creator, artist and entrepreneur who has an ability to really connect with people,” she said. “I cherish it and try to use it in the best way that I always can.”

    That’s great advice, according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch. Welch told CNBC Make It in 2017 that you can “find your area of destiny” by identifying overlaps between your unique skills or talents, activities you enjoy doing and “areas of economic growth or opportunity that have interest to you.”


    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article

  • Monday, September 20, 2021 4:00 AM | Anonymous

    Every journey to success starts with a dream. But how do you get from where you are now to where you want to be? One way to increase your chances is by following in the footsteps of those who’ve already walked the path. And so to help you take those all-important first steps, the researchers from OnDeck collected the best pieces of business advice from 15 of the world’s greatest female founders and CEOs.


    • It's OK To Fail

    Whitney Wolfe Herd is one highly successful CEO who embraces her failures. "When you accept that failure is a good thing, it can actually be a huge propeller toward success," says the Bumble Founder and CEO.


    General Motors CEO Mary Barra is another high-flying businesswoman who isn't afraid to show her vulnerable side. "It's OK to admit what you don't know," urges Barra. "It's OK to ask for help. And it's OK to listen to the people you lead."


    • Stay Grounded

    Indra Nooyi has a list of accolades she could boast about. She earned an MBA from Yale Business School, sits on the board of Amazon, and regularly features in the Forbes list of the 100 most powerful women in the world. But the former CEO of PepsiCo doesn't let any of this go to her head. Instead, she is always willing to listen and learn. "Just because you're CEO, don't think you've landed," warns Indra. "You should always be learning about the way you think."


    • Working Smart Beats Working Hard

    Hard work matters. But the real key to success is combining hard work with smart work. In other words, focus on productivity rather than hours clocked.

    This is how Flickr’s boss Caterina Fake approaches her day. "So often people are working hard on the wrong thing," says Fake. "[But] working on the right thing is more important than working hard."

    Karen Young, the founder of Oui the People, has some similar advice for aspiring CEOs. She says, "The simplest time management skill as an entrepreneur comes down to understanding what's most important."


    • Forget About Perfection

    "Perfection is the enemy," warns LeanIn Founder Sheryl Sandberg. "Trying to do it all and expecting it can all be done right is a recipe for disappointment."

    Sandberg's approach involves learning how to let go and delegate tasks to those more qualified than you. And that's something Helen Robertson mastered a long time ago. The Expedia Cruise boss has no ego when it comes to surrounding herself with the best people. "You never have to feel like the smartest person in the room, '' says Helen. "Building a good team requires you to hire people that may know more in a certain subject than you do."


    Click Here to Read the Rest of the Article.



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